Haunted Ghost Tours Aboard the S.S. Keewatin

SS Keewatin Ghost Tours

 

Known as the most haunted ship in all of the western hemisphere, the Keewatin has been lurking in an unfamiliar land for over 45 years in the muddy, dark, depths of the Kalamazoo River, Michigan.

It has now has travelled back to its rightful home on the shores of Georgian Bay in the historic Port McNicoll, and yet the chilling vibrations of ghostly apparitions have only gotten louder and more present. This 107 year old vessel echoes with the sounds of a distant past; one shared by thousands and cherished by all of those who sailed on her.

 Legends tell the tale of how the great ship Keewatin sailed the shores of Northern Canada from 1907, but few know of the colourful personalities whose spirits and secrets remained on the ship long after the final paying passengers wished their goodbyes. Launched 5 years before Titanic and sister to the Empress of Ireland, Keewatin is perfectly preserved, almost as if it was still in 1907. It’s stories of paranormal experiences were reported as early as 1910, when passengers began to recount strange sensations, odd sounds, and visions of people dressed as if it were centuries before. Paranormal experts have documented extremely high levels of spirit activity all over the ship. Visitors to the ship can feel drops in temperature and rapid shifts in the energy field between rooms and within the labyrinth of chambers.

Come visit the Keewatin and test the energy bands with the guidance of our experts to see for yourself the phenomena. Some of you may cross paths the famous ship spirit Rosie who might just grace you with a dance if you are lucky enough to catch a glimpse.

This fall for only 6 dates the Kee will open her doors in the evening for Ghost Tours. This October 16th & 17th and then again October 23rd & 24th, 2014, and finally October 30th and 31st. The stories talk about ghosts appearing after the sun has set. We are offering 72 individuals per night the opportunity to walk the ship’s decks once the sun has set. These lantern guided tours will show off the glory and beauty of this vessel while stirring up the nights energies! Come join us!!!

Tickets: $15/person (including children and seniors). Tickets are available for purchase only online:

http://www.sskeewatin.com/visit/ghost-tours/buy-tickets/

Ghost Tours for Groups

Looking for a meetup venue for your organization that’s different and fun? We’ve reserved the last three Thursdays in October for Ghost Tours for Groups of 12 or more, and we’ll provide a guide dedicated to your organization to help make the Ghost Tour your own.

For more information, email: 2015ghostgroups@sskeewatin.com, or call 855-533-9284 Ext 815.

 

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