Marjorie Patterson December 29, 1929 – May 18, 2014

Patterson

Pre-deceased by her parents, Alice Mary Patterson (née Bull) and Thomas Cragg Patterson, both originally of England. Beloved and cherished by her common-law husband of 28 years, Rick London. Sorely missed by her “sister” from early teens, Edna Jackson.

Marjorie was a major presence in Toronto area yacht race management for over 30 years. Interclub racing through CYRA and MYRC, later LORC, brought her to many of the clubs where she gained a reputation of being, “tough, but fair”.

Although she always paid her dues to Boulevard Club (her home club), Marjorie was honoured with memberships in many clubs because of her involvement in their racing programs. Four clubs never forgot her; Island Yacht Club, Queen City Yacht Club, National Yacht Club and Royal Canadian Yacht Club.

Marjorie was also involved with the committee which organized the Canada I Luncheon. Everyone involved enjoyed themselves so much, in spite of all the hard work, they decided to do it again, thus the Spring Thaw Luncheon was born, sponsored by Beryl and Derek Tidd.

The group raised thousands for various charities including Toronto Brigantine and OSA’s BOOM program.

She treasured her involvement with the Shellback Club of Toronto. For more than a decade she was First Mate of the club, helping to make it run properly; organizing annual dinners, writing and mailing newsletters, looking after the badges, etc. She always said, “It’s easy to do nice things for nice people”, and that sentiment extended to just about everyone she met in the sailing community.

This past while, Marjorie wouldn’t have been able to carry on at home without help from CCAC. She never wanted to go to hospital, or anywhere else that might be able to take better care of her. Through VHA, they provided personal care workers that were exemplary. Always cheerful and competent, never dour, her needs were taken care of with compassion and a sense of fun.

Although they are all wonderful, Sharon McLean and Eugenia Romero are two PSWs who epitomize the best of their profession. For medical needs while at home, Dr. Harvey Pasternak (Marjorie’s family doctor), and nurse Margaret Salata of Para-Med, saw to Marjorie’s well being. Without their continued monitoring and ministrations, Marjorie would not have fared so well for so long.

Marjorie was forced to go to Toronto Western Hospital Emergency about 10 days before she died because of multiple serious problems. In spite of the seriousness of her illness, they were able to stabilize her enough to get her upstairs to acute care. There, the wonderful staff further managed to improve her health to the point they were considering her eventual discharge. Alas, it was not to be. Shortly before breakfast, Sunday, she quietly slipped away with Rick by her side. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial date to be published later. Please consider a charity of your choice in remembrance.

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