CAN Sail GP News: a Fourth, Possible New Owners, Canadian Event, New Intern

SailGP

On Saturday, racing with the 24M wings and small jibs presented challenges for all the teams, especially as the wind conditions got lighter and shiftier. An issue with the jib halyard lock onboard the Canadian F50 SPIRIT just minutes before the start of race two put the team under extra pressure.

July 26, 2023

New logos on the F50 so far this season

It was off to LA for the second event of SailGP Season 4 this weekend.

On Saturday, racing with the 24M wings and small jibs presented challenges for all the teams, especially as the wind conditions got lighter and shiftier. An issue with the jib halyard lock onboard the Canadian F50 SPIRIT just minutes before the start of race two put the team under extra pressure. Phil Robertson and the Canadians placed 5th, 7th and 3rd to round out the day in fifth place overall.

 

“It was a tricky day, but pretty good sailing. Overall, lots to work on, but lots of good takeaways,” said grinder Tom Ramshaw.

The teams had the largest (29M) wings and full complement of six crew onboard when racing got underway at 1610 PST on Sunday. The Canadian team started consistently and was very much in the mix, finishing in third and fourth place on the day but missing out on advancing to the event final by a mere point, to finish in fourth overall.

To review the weekend, we had a lot of points left out there and to come within one point of making the final is disappointing,’ said Phil.

Ownership and Event Optimism

Can SailGPWith ten more events to go in the season and new ownership pending, there is lots more to come from the Canadian team. “A bid for the team has been accepted by SailGP so, it’s about finalizing all the paperwork. Hopefully, we’ll have a new ownership group and be on our way again very soon,” said Phil at the opening press conference of the Oracle Los Angeles Sail Grand Prix.

SailGP is also working hard to finalize the details of the Canadian event planned for this season. “It will be huge to have a home event. Since the start of this team, sailing in Canada has changed completely. The team has been a catalyst for a new generation of sailors and now we’re seeing so much foiling activity going on in Canada, so we can’t wait to race at home,” said Phil.

Joining the team in Los Angeles as an intern was weCANfoil Development Athlete Tate Howell. An aspiring foiler from Toronto, Tate took part in the SailGP Inspire regatta in Chicago and was the only career intern at the Oracle Los Angeles Sail Grand Prix. As part of the team’s commitment to developing new athletes and the SailGP Women’s Pathway Programme, the team will continue to offer opportunities to talented Canadian youth and grow the sport.

From Los Angeles, the fleet heads to Saint-Tropez, for the first of three European events in Season 4. Racing will take place on 9-10 September.

SAILGP SEASON 4 CHAMPIONSHIP STANDINGS (After Two Events) //

1 // Australia // 17 points
2 // Spain // 16 points
3 // ROCKWOOL Denmark // 16 points
4 // Canada // 15 points
5 // New Zealand // 14 points
6 // Emirates GBR // 9 points
7 // United States // 8 points
8 // France // 8 points
9 // Switzerland // 5 points
10 // Germany // 0 point

Canada SailGP Team Crew List // Oracle Los Angeles SailGP

Phil Robertson / Driver
Chris Draper / Wing Trimmer
Billy Gooderham / Flight Controller
Tim Hornsby / Grinder
Tom Ramshaw / Grinder
Jake Lilley / Grinder
Isabella Bertold / Strategist
Jareese Finch / Reserve Sailor

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