The Galley Guys Meet the Ropot – Intelligent Robot Cooker

GG Toast

June 7, 2017

By Andy Adams

Jan Willem De Jong, Managing Director at Neptunus Yachts (from the left) hosted the Galley Guys, Greg Nicoll and John Armstrong while Andy Adams snapped the pic.

While many people are apprehensive about the approaching automated intelligence technologies and their potential impact on our lives in the future, the Galley Guys were quick to embrace the Ropot – Intelligent Robot Cooker.

Push a few buttons, wait a few minutes and bingo! General Tsao Stir Fry Chicken dinner in one pot – meat, sauce and spices, heated, stirred and ready to serve.

To further accommodate the “ready in minutes” meal plan, we also went to the new PC Asian Style Long Grain Rice in the microwave package. Just nuke and eat!

Again Jan Willem De Jong hosted the occasion aboard a new Neptunus 550 Express and while we enjoyed the spacious and well-equipped galley with it’s granite counters and ceramic cooking surface, the Ropot still proved to be easily stored and very handy to use.

The Ropot – Intelligent Robot Cooker has several advantages for use on board. It’s an induction cooking system that has no flame or even a hot stove top element – the cooker and pot are all in one including an automated stirring paddle. The cooker comes with a recipe book and the dishes all looked to be fairly easy to make, flavourful and above all – fast.

Ropot ControlWe put John Armstrong to (easy) work in the galley of the Neptunus 550 adding the ingredients to the Ropot – Intelligent Robot Cooker.

The newly invented automated cooking system uses a non-stick coated pot and a lid that eliminates oil smoke in your galley. The Ropot offers the following cooking functions: Stir-fry, Sauté, Manual, Braise, Pan-fry, Stew/Steam, Deep-fry, Roast and Toss functions.

For cruisers who may need to fire up the gen-set for cooking, the Ropot – Intelligent Robot Cooker offers quite an energy saving. It only took an average of three to four minutes to cook many of the recipes.

For our General Tsao Stir Fry Chicken dinner, we followed the recipe in the cook book that comes with the Ropot. It uses boneless chicken thighs and breasts cut into chunks, then tossed in a mixture of eggs, flour, brown sugar, Hoisin and soy sauce plus a few other things that are all likely to be in your galley anyway.

Simple PrepThe General Tsao Stir Fry Chicken dinner recipe only needed a few ingredients, all added at once and the Ropot did the rest!

Everything goes into the Ropot. Program the simple digital control panel and by the time you have the table set, dinner is ready!

We matched our dinner with a Canadian VQA East Dell Gamay Noir that worked well with the pepper and other Asian flavours, but a cold beer might have been just as good.

RiceMaking a simple meal even easier, the PC PC Asian Style Long Grain Rice was ready in seconds.

Here are a few video links if you want to learn more. Bon apetite!


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How to use control panel


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Stir-fry Asparagus via Ropot

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Braised Chicken with Vegetables via Ropot

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Manual + Stir Desserts (E.g.: Waltnuts) via Ropot

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Pant-Fry Salmon via Ropot

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Pan-fry Steaks via Ropot

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Saute Vegetables via Ropot

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Introduction to Ropot

 

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