CYOB INBOX – November 24

CY Inbox

 

Nov 23, 2016

Letters to the editor, rants, complaints and oh yes, unsolicited compliments. They all go straight into the INBOX. We’d love to hear from you at CYonboard@kerrwil.com

We may edit them for length and to take out the really nasty words but we promise to read them all. Bring it.

Last time, I asked you about how you cover your boats and you didn’t shrink away from the topic. Here are two votes for tarps. Apparently these two don’t need to see a shrink. (ok, no more puns)

Hi CYOB,
I have a 32′ Carver that I tarp every Fall. The tarp costs C$45.00 (on average) from a discount supplier in London, Ontario. It takes 2 hours to take off the canvas and install the tarp over the supports that normally hold the canvas in place. (No extra supports are needed.) The rope is reused every year. I use pool noodles cut into short lengths and slit half way through to prevent the corners of the support rails from cutting through the tarp. These are reused every year.

I hang bottles of antifreeze on the tarp to prevent it from lifting on windy days and to reduce the strain on the eyes of the tarp – I use golf balls behind the tarp as hanging points. The golf balls are picked up by a friend’s dog during the summer when she takes him for his walks. Our marina is next door to a golf course, so they are free… and reusable.

If I am lucky, the tarp may be reusable the following year, but this has only happened once. The worst case I have run into was having to put the tarp back on after a hurricane pulled it off a few years ago.

Here’s the math.
Cost of shrink wrapping @ C$16.00 per foot = 32 x 16 = C$512.00 + tax.
Cost of tarp installation with help from friends = C$45.00 + case of beer = C$80.00 (approx. depending on price of beer)
Savings = C$432.00

I think I’m ahead of the game 🙂

Regards,
Chuck Rea
Bridgeview Marina
Point Edward, Ontario

Hi CYOB,
My Genco cover paid for itself in 3 years vs. shrink wrap (this is 4th year). That alone makes it worthwhile before thinking of environmental issues, how much nicer and more accessible my boat is during the off season, etc., etc. and I fully expect the quality of the material will last upwards of 10 years.

I have a simple wooden frame rather than aluminum made of reusable 2x4s. It goes up easily and quickly. This fall I installed the frame and cover on my 33’ Hunter in 2 ½ hours with my wife providing just a modicum of assistance. Luckily for me storage space isn’t an issue although when dry the cover folds to a size no larger than my main sail.

Wayne Kentner
St Thomas, ON

 

 

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