CPS-ECP Member, Instructor and Partner Win CASBA Awards

CPS Casba

 

Jan 26, 2016

The Canadian Safe Boating Awards or “CASBAs” represent the best of what’s happening on and around the recreational waters across this country. On January 10th, the Canadian Safe Boating Council hosted the annual CASBA gala evening in recognition of those who have distinguished themselves in the fields of boating safety and environmental stewardship during the 2015 boating season. The recipients represent the general boating community, volunteers, professionals, companies and organizations and were selected from a host of nominations received from the public at large from across Canada. 

Top Volunteer Dedicated to Boating Safety: Gary Clow

As a volunteer with the Canadian Power and Sail Squadrons since 1998, Gary has served in a variety of capacities in two Squadrons. A newsletter editor and contributor, executive positions, including Commander, as well as a training officer. While Gary has given in excess of 2,500 hours of his time, it has been his commitment and drive to develop and an on-water course standard that set’s him above his peers. While others doubted it was possible, he committed his efforts to transitioning lessons from the classroom to application on the water. If your Squadron is interested in running a pilot of the on-water course please contact the National Office at: hqg@cps-ecp.

Marine Professional of the Year: Jim Millson

A serving member with the Ontario Provincial Police for over 30 years, Jim has spent a significant portion of his service dedicated to marine policing on the north shore of Lake Erie. His determination to address the many safety and policing challenges in particular for “Pottahawk Sunday” (2,500 boats and almost 10,000 people in the water) led to the creation of an operations plan that resulted in no Impaired charges, no medical calls or stranded individuals and under 60 tickets laid despite 600 vessel inspections in one weekend. Jim’s reputation for engaging youth, working with clubs and marine professionals for positive results is admired by his peers. Jim Millson works closely with Port Dover Power and Sail Squadron and is one of their instructors.

Safe Guarding the Environment: CIL Orion 

Nobody wants to see expired marine flares dumped in our landfills and CIL Orion in partnership with the Canadian Power and Sail Squadrons has made a significant commitment to ensure these pyrotechnics are dealt with in an environmentally friendly manner. After a pilot project in 2014, CIL Orion committed to a Canada wide initiative to dispose of collected flares, regardless of manufacture. In 2015, over 20,000 flares were neutralized and recycled at their facility in Quebec and it is projected another 50,000 may be collected over the next 2 years. 

 

For a complete list of winners visit: www.csbc.ca

 

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