Safety Equipment Education and Flare Disposal Days Are Back!

Safety Days

March 22 2016

Have Your Flares Expired?

If your flares have a manufacture date of 2012 or earlier they have or will expire this year. You can’t light them, throw them in the water or in your household garbage to dispose of them.
 
Disposing of expired flares has been an ongoing dilemma for boaters across the country. To help boaters dispose of expired flares in a safe and environmentally responsible manner CPS-ECP and selected CIL/Orion Dealers are hosting Safety Equipment Education and Flare Disposal Days. On these days, you will be offered the opportunity to learn about required safety equipment and you can bring your outdated flares to be properly disposed of, free of charge.
 
In accordance with Transport Canada requirements, flares are approved for four years from the date of manufacture. Typically, this means that boaters need to replace their flares every third or fourth boating season. If they have a manufacture date of 2012 or earlier they have expired or will expire during this boating season, boaters are required replace them… it’s the law! 
 
Dates and locations:
 
Date Retailer Location
April 9 Trotac Marine
370 Gorge Rd E, Victoria, BC V8T 2W2
 
April 16 Xtreme Marine
1978 Westchester Bourne, Nilestown, ON, N6M 1H6
 
April 22-24 The Rigging Shoppe
44 Midwest Rd, Scarborough, ON M1P 3A9
 

April 23 Waypoint Marine
2240 Harbour Rd, Sidney, BC V8L 2P6

 
April 23 Lake’s Marine Supply
5968 Trans Canada Hwy, Duncan, BC V9L 6C8
 
April 23 Driftwood Auto and Marine
4605 Bedwell Harbour Rd, Pender Island, BC V0N 2M1
 
May 7 Steveston Marine and Hardware
3560 Moncton St, Richmond, BC, V7E 3A2
 
May 7 Steveston Marine and Hardware
1667 W 5th Ave, Vancouver, BC, V6J 1N5
 
May 14 Steveston Marine and Hardware
201-19700 Langley Bypass, Langley, BC, V3A 7B1

May 14 Wills Marine
1797 Comox Ave, Comox, BC V9M 3L9
 
May 21 The Bitter End Boaters Exchange
1044 Seamount Way, Gibsons, BC V0N 1V7
 
May 21 Mitchell’s Bay Marine Park
3 Allen St, Mitchell’s Bay, ON, N0P 1L0
 
May 28 Boulet et Lemelin Yacht
1125, boul Champlain, Ville de Québec, QC G1K 0A2
 
May 28 Nat’s Marine Supplies
590 Liverpool Rd, Pickering, ON L1W 1P9

May 28 Bridge Yachts
49 Harbour St, Port Dover, ON N0A 1N0
 
May 28 L’entrepot Marine
379 Boul Harwood, Vaudreoil Dorion, QC, J7V 7W1
 
June 4 The Yacht Shop
3514 Joseph Howe Dr, Halifax, NS B3L 4H7
 
June 4 Inlet Marine
850 Barnett Hwy, Port Moody, BC V3H 1V6
 
June 4 Charlottetown Yacht Club/Marine
1 Pownal St, Charlottetown, PE C1A 7M4
 
June 15 Kincardine Canadian Tire
811 Durham St. Kincardine, ON N2Z 3B8
 
June 24 Krate’s Marina
290 The Queensway S, Keswick, ON L4P 4H3
 
July 9 Canadian Tire Baie Comeau
650 Parfondeval, Baie Comeau, QC, G5C 3R3
 
August 13 Marina Shores
520 Hwy 50 Port Rowan, ON, N0E 1M0
 
Visit cps-ecp.ca often for updates.
 

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